R.I.P. Julian Bond

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“Violence is black children going to school for 12 years and receiving 6 years’ worth of education. 

“Any time someone carries a picket sign in front of the White House, that is the First Amendment in action. 

“The war in Iraq has as much to do with terrorism as the administration has to do with compassion.

“As legal slavery passed, we entered into a permanent period of unemployment and underemployment from which we have yet to emerge. 

“The First Amendment means everything to me.

- Julian Bond

There we were last night performing “Let Freedom Ring,” in honour of Dr Martin Luther King, in Costa Mesa to celebrate the 50th anniversary this month, where documents were signed that declared all African Americans the legitimate right to vote, yet not being aware that one of the most prolific activist of the Civil Rights Movement leaders, Julian Bond, had passed.

Horace Julian Bond, born 14 January 1940, transition 15 August 2015. I first recognised Julian back in 1986, doing an interview on national TV. It immediately struck me how eloquent and articulate he was on getting his message across. He remain a solid and focused figure in my eyes from then on.

Julian, at least you were around long enough to witness that 50 year milestone of progress in American history. You will be sadly missed by those that knew you.

Condolences to your sincere friends and family.

Bless.

3 thoughts on “R.I.P. Julian Bond”

  1. Condolences to family/friends of Julian Bond. May he rest in peace.
    Thank you dear Dread for sharing this, never heared bout him. But he (and you ) is so right….. ‘As legal slavery passed…… We have yet to emerge’

    1. Just took this from wikipedia “On April 17, 1960, Bond helped co-found the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC).[10] He served as the communications director of SNCC from January 1961 to September 1966, when he traveled around Georgia, Alabama, Mississippi, and Arkansas to help organize civil rights and voter registration drives. Bond left Morehouse College in 1961 to work on civil rights in the South.[11] From 1960 to 1963, he led student protests against segregation in public facilities and the Jim Crow laws of Georgia.[12]

      He returned in 1971 at age 31 to complete his Bachelor of Arts in English.[13] With Morris Dees, Bond helped found the Southern Poverty Law Center (SPLC), a public-interest law firm based in Montgomery, Alabama.[14] He served as its president from 1971 to 1979.[15] Bond was an emeritus member of the Southern Poverty Law Center board of directors at his death.[16]“

      1. Researching ,came across this ….Horace Julian Bond:’ Reflections from the Frontlines of the Civil Rights Movement is a documentary film by Eduardo Montes-Bradley,[1] a portrait of social activist and former Georgia legislator Julian Bond. In the film Bond approaches the Civil Rights Movement from a personal perspective. “Bond’s father was the first African-American president of Pennsylvania’s Lincoln University, and the family hosted black luminaries in education and the arts, but Bond recalls growing up in the era of “separate but equal” laws”.[2] Bond also talks about his early involvement with the Civil Rights Movement, his nomination at the age of 28 for vice president of the United States, and the Georgia legislature’s efforts to prevent him from being seated as a representative on the grounds that he had not supported the Vietnam War. The film explores the 1963 March on Washington, Martin Luther King Jr., the assassinations of King and John F. Kennedy, and Lyndon B. Johnson’s impact on U.S. race relations. Bond also offers his own insights, and adds some personal revelations, such as the fact that he was a published poet during his college years. The film closes with a montage of major African-American figures from Frederick Douglass and Karl Marx, to Abraham Lincoln and Spike Lee. Julian Bond, premiered at the Virginia Film Festival on November 4, 2012.

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