Monthly Archives: November 2013

Give Thanks and Praises

Hail Mi Irieites,

While the US are “giving thanks” with Thanksgiving, where everyone is gathering from all over the country to be with their loved ones, we must not forget those who are without – without family, friends, food or even a home.  May you also continue to pay homage to the original ancestors…

Peace and Love, continually!!!

In the meantime, because of the positive response towards H.I.M Hail Selassie I and his attendance at the funeral of JFK, we would like to mention a few key points of fact in regards to the mode of thinking JFK might have had prior to that time.

H.I.M. Emperor Haile Selassie 1st stayed at the White House during his short visit to Washington DC, before going on to New York. The dates are highly significant. It is more than likely that H.I.M. Emperor Haile Selassie 1st encouraged the young American President to heed the message of his forthcoming speech at the United Nations, about universal human rights, and the danger of perpetual war. Kennedy knew very well that in the United States, the richest country in the world, there were “first and second class citizens,” and a “philosophy that holds one race superior and another inferior.”

On October 2, 1963, President John F. Kennedy met with Secretary of Defense Robert McNamara and General Maxwell Taylor, who had just returned from Vietnam. That evening, the White House announced that it would begin withdrawing ‘military advisors’ from Vietnam.

On October 3, Emperor Haile Selassie 1st left Washington D.C. for New York City.

On October 4, 1963, the Emperor delivered his ‘War’ speech to the assembly conference, speaking in the ancient Ethiopian language of Amharic.

On October 5, 1963, JFK announced his formal decision to withdraw from Vietnam, beginning with a withdrawal of 1,000 of the 16,000 ‘military advisors’. Historians disagree about JFK’s true intentions about Vietnam. Yet the historical record shows that he first announced the decision to end the conflict while Emperor Haile Sellassie 1st was present in the White House. His Majesty and the American president were sending the world a sign of solidarity.

Six weeks later on November 22, 1963, President John F. Kennedy was murdered in Dallas, Texas.

Remembering JFK

kennedy

Yes Mi Irieites,

We are only less than 3 hours away to commemorate one of the world’s most notorious events;  the tragic assassination of John Fitzgerald Kennedy, the 35th president of the United States of America.

I was 7 years old when this incident took place and I remember it clearly as if it was only yesterday.   As a matter of fact, every now and again I try to compare any other atrocity that surpasses or even came close to the impact this incident had on the world.  To reiterate my point, with no disrespect, not even Neil Armstrong’s landing on the moon, the 9/11 Twin Towers, the death of Michael Jackson, Elvis Presley, Bob Marley or even John Lennon came close to how devastated and shocked the world was at that time.

To many from the black diaspora Kennedy was recognised as a symbol of hope and the first real step towards racial equality and liberation, despite the missiles crisis of Cuba and the Cold War with the USSR.  Even Jamaicans residing all the way in England were shook up on hearing the news.

As the repeated images are now all deeply etched in our minds over and over again for the past 50 years, we have been led to believe that it was one lone crazed gunman; a far cry from the story Oliver Stone unfolded in his 1991 released film.

So does the Kennedy curse continue?  So many incidents have happened since his death, the murder of his brother Bobby (1968), the car crash of Ted Kennedy in Mass (1969), and much more recently, the tragic death of John-John Junior (1999).   Yet the memories of what happened 50 years overshadows them all.

One thing for sure, the world will be keeping this incident alive for the next 50 years and beyond.

And to our elderly fans out there… send some info on where you were and what you are doing at the time when this news happened.  It would be interesting to know how well your memory serves you.

The Courage of Ruby Bridges

Hail Mi Irieites,The-problem-we-all-live-with-norman-rockwell

From Wikipedia:

In spring of 1960, Ruby Bridges was one of 6 black children in New Orleans to pass the test that determined whether or not the black children would go to the all white school. She went to a school by herself while the other 5 children went somewhere else. Six students were chosen; however, two students decided to stay at their old school, and three were transferred to Mcdonough. Ruby was the only one assigned to William Frantz. Her father was initially reluctant, but her mother felt strongly that the move was needed not only to give her own daughter a better education, but to “take this step forward … for all African-American children.” Her mother finally convinced her father to let her go to the school.

US_Marshals_with_Young_Ruby_Bridges_on_School_Steps

The story of Ruby Bridges reminds us all to never take anything for granted. And today, in a time when voting rights are once again being threatened, let us think about her courage and her parents’ willingness to stand up for the good of all.

After all these years, we still have a long way to go.

Raspect.

Prayers for my father

Hail Mi Irieites,

Today, I bear strong thoughts of my father, Charles Percival Hinds (15.11.1921- 08.11.2003).

Even now I give thanks for his endurance, patience and belief in the band; long before the world had recognised our potential.  It was through his eyes that I initially viewed the world and its political history.  Though his methods were crude in description, I was able to adapt and interpret from him the energy, that you, our fans, have been able to identify with in our music.

Homage to the original Mr Hinds….

The Coronation of H.I.M. Haile Selassie I

Hail Mi Irieites,

On this day in 1930,  more than 72 nations converged on Addis Ababa, Ethiopia for the coronation of H.I.M. Haile Sellassie I (Qädamawi Haylä Səllasé).

Born Lij Tafari Makonnen Woldemikael, the ascending King Tafari Makonnen broke from tradition and ensured that both the Empress Menen Asfaw and HIMself were crowned within the same ceremony.